How to stay motivated

Next time you’re struggling to stay motivated and focused it might be worth taking a fresh look at why. Research suggests that it is likely to be because you feel forced, can’t see the point of the activity or doubt your own capabilities

Studies show that we are more motivated when we feel in control. If we choose a course of action consistent with our own opinions we tend to persist for longer, suggesting that pursuing a task we endorse is energising, whereas acting under duress is taxing.

When we’re true to our own beliefs and values our motivation increases, for example studies show a clear correlation between students valuing a subject and being willing to independently investigate a question. If you’re struggling with motivation, reflecting on why an activity is meaningful can make you feel more invested in it.

Our perception of our own capabilities also plays a key role in motivation. Research indicates that the more competent we are at something the more likely it is that we will want to pursue it. A study of student athletes showed that practice made the students more likely to consider themselves competent, and a sense of competence meant that they were more likely to engage in athletic activity. Similar studies in music and academics suggest the same thing.

Believing that effort pays off can also inspire us to stay motivated and keep learning. Carol S Dweck, a psychologist at Stanford University found that people who credit their success to innate talent rather than hard work give up more easily when facing a new challenge because they assume it exceeds their ability.

Read more about sustaining motivation in Scientific American Mind.

Learn more about your mind in our illustrated guides, The Mind Manual and A Mind for Business, published by Hamlyn Press and Pearson/FT.

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